Skin Care

Top 4 Lies From Skin Care Labels

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Nowadays, almost every girl spends tons of dollars on buying skin care products which promise a healthier, younger, and glowing skin. When girls go to buy a skin care product, it is the label which they give the most attention. Although these labels with golden promises persuade us to buy certain products, most of these labels don’t accurately describe the products we buy, and this could lead to more harm than good in the long run. So here are five things to look out for before buying your next skin care product.

1. Factor in Fragrance: Some people don’t like using strong fragranced products because they have a tendency to be irritating to the skin, so they prefer products that are fragrance-free because it is safe. But sometimes you may end up with reaction even when you are using unscented products. “A lot of companies add masking fragrances to cover the scent of other ingredients — and the FDA doesn’t require that these masking fragrances be included on the ingredient list,” says Laura Verallo de Bertotto, CEO of VMV Hypoallergenics. While the term hypoallergenic means that a product has only a small chance of causing an allergic reaction, if you’re prone to reacting you should always do a patch test when trying something new.

2. Test For Sensitive Skin: A lot of products will claim to be hypoallergenic or made for sensitive skin to give people the idea that they’ll be gentle. But these claims are not guaranteed, even when they’re on the packaging. The best way to figure it out is to always test the product on a small patch of skin on your forearm for about a week to give time for any adverse reactions to come about. That way, you can figure out for sure if it was really made with sensitive skin in mind or if you should avoid the product altogether.

3. All-Natural Mean Nothing: When a label says “all-natural” doesn’t mean that the ingredients in that product are all organic or natural. Cosmetics companies are given a lot of leeway in terms of product language. Board-certified dermatologist Rajani Katta brings up the very important point that so many different things can be considered all-natural — even things like poison ivy.

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And sometimes, even if an all-natural ingredient is good for your skin, companies could mix that ingredient together with more harmful preservatives, negating those positive effects while still marketing it as an all-natural product.

4. ‘Dermatologist tested’ doesn’t mean dermatologist endorsed: Just because a dermatologist tested a product doesn’t mean he or she liked the product. It’s a semantic trick, and the phrase is basically meaningless.

Top 4 Lies From Skin Care Labels

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